USIMD logo
  USIMD home USIMD log In Sign Up!
USIMD Life : Your Healthy Living. Click Here!
Welcome, USIMD.com medical contents search July 23, 2014
       USIMD Life
       Medical Supplies
       Calorie Count
       Self-Diagnosis
       Physician Search
       Message Board
      E-mail Doctor
      E-mail Veterinarian
      Self-Diagnosis
      Health-O-Matic Meter
      Calorie Count
      Natural Medicine
      Vitamins & Minerals
      Alternative Living
      My Health Chart
      Diseases & Treatments
      Atlas of Diseases
      Sexually Transmitted
      Diseases
      Drug Information
      Illegal Drugs
      Lab & Diagnostic Tests
      Internal Medicine
      Women’s Health
      Pediatrics
      Eye Disorders
      Skin Disorders
      Headache
      Mental Health
      Radiology
      Neurology
      Allergy
      Resource Links
      Physician Directory
      Dentist Directory
      Hospital Directory





Spleen Problems

more about Spleen Problems




Normal

Abnormal
  • The spleen is an organ located in the left upper abdomen under the ribs, involved in immune functions.  It is important in fighting infections caused by bacteria that are encapsulated (have a capsule around them).  Examples of these bacteria include Streptococcus Pneumonia and Hemophilus Influenza (they cause ear infections, Pneumonias, and Meningitis).
  • The spleen, if injured, may cause massive bleeding.  A Laceration of the spleen due to an injury may require its removal.
  • The spleen may become enlarged in diseases such as Mononucleosis, liver Cirrhosis, Lymphoma, Leukemia, Polycythemia Vera.  An enlarged spleen may not function properly, and may be an increased risk of injury because it will drop below the ribs.
  • In the disease Sickle Cell Anemia, the spleen "infarcts" i.e., becomes damaged to due insufficient oxygenated blood, causing the spleen to shrink in size and become nonfunctional.

  • Treat the underlying cause
  • Patients who have permanent spleen damage or who have had their spleens removed should have a Pneumococcal vaccine (protects against strains of Streptococcus Pneumonia) every five to seven years.  In addition, a vaccine against Hemophilus B bacteria should be considered.




more about Spleen Problems


If you want your friend to read or know about this article, Click here






medical contents search

Home   |   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Employment Ad   |   Help

Terms and Conditions under which this service is provided to you. Read our Privacy Policy.
Copyright © 2002 - 2003 USIMD, Inc All right reserved.